Did Meteor Strikes Cause California Wildfires?

For unknown reasons the government and law enforcement are hiding the true cause of wildfires that have left over thirty dead (with 400 missing) and destroyed over 5,700 structures in northern California, says Marie Jasper,  a Sonoma County resident whose home the fire reduced to a burning pile of cinders. Since 8 October, more than fifteen fires have scorched 220,000 acres of land.

Ms. Jasper said she believes the fires—or at least the one that scorched her neighborhood—were caused by meteor showers that she and her neighbors claim to have witnessed. According to her, she and a small group of friends had been outdoors on October 8 when they spotted several “blue-white” fireballs streaking across the sky. She said she heard a deafening rumble, as if the sky was being torn open, before at least one meteor penetrated the atmosphere intact and struck a densely wooded area northwest of her home.

“We tried to photograph it as it was coming in, but they were just too fast. There one second; a split second later, we heard that horrible noise in the sky and then the ground shook, as it hit not too far from here, I imagine. Almost immediately, flames began licking the treetops. We knew we were in trouble. There was more than one; other people must have seen them too. I don’t know how many or where exactly the others hit.”

Although meteor showers are common, and in fact a dozen meteor showers—Leonids, Lyrids, Persids, etc—occur on regular intervals each year, none was anticipated the week of October 8. Besides, most small meteors associated with known showers vaporize in the Earth’s atmosphere. Meteor strikes, experts say, occur five to ten times each year; large events such as Russia’s 2013 Chelyabinsk meteor, which damaged 7,200 buildings across six cities and wounded 1,700 people, happen every five years.

The rise of social media, however, and independently (non-government) operated websites, suggest meteor and asteroid strikes occur far more frequently, supporting contentions that the government is willfully concealing accurate data from public view.

Ms. Jasper said she believes this is the case with meteor that impacted near her home. “I called the fire department. I called the police. I told them I’d seen a meteor hit the ground. They told me “don’t worry about it” and to listen to emergency broadcasts for instructions on evacuation procedures. They didn’t give a damn about why I had to tell them.”

A neighbor of hers wishing to remain anonymous confirmed the sighting, claiming she, too, had seen an ominous fireball with a clearly defined tail soaring overhead that evening.

If all information is accurate, the government must be held accountable for hiding this information from citizens who have lost their homes and family.

As a side note, Russian astronomer Dr. Dyomin Damir Zhakarovich has previously attributed the marked rise in meteor strikes to the presence of a brown dwarf star with several companion planets encroaching on our inner solar system. The Nibiru system, he said, is littered with trash—tens of thousands of asteroids and meteorites that are periodically ejected in Earth’s direction.

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